Blue Lotus

The Secret Life of the Blue Lotus

Blue Lotus (Nymphaea Caerulea) is also known as Blue Water Lily and the Sacred Lily of the Nile.

The plant, a natural sedative, originate from along the Nile River, in Egypt. For thousands of years it was used by the native people as part of religious ceremonies in which they would use these sacred blue flowers to reach higher levels of consciousness. During third century, it was introduced to the conquering Greeks who in turn exported it to far regions of the world.

In addition to it’s use in perfumes, it is still used today as a mild sedative. According to Egyptian legend, it was such a good sedative that it was given to sun god Ra in an effort to sooth him as he grew old.

Methods of Use

Blue lotus (Nymphaea Caerulea) can be ingested through a variety of methods. It is believed to be the plant that Lotophagi ate in “The Odyssey“. Since then, people have been eating the plant. More commonly, in the modern world, it is brewed into a tea (or mixed into various cocktails, wines, and liquors) by boiling the entire plant for 20-30 minutes before ingesting.

It can be smoked as well, but should be a blend of petals and bulbs, not solely one or the other as the majority of the ingredient lies in the bulb, and some in the petals. Furthermore, it can be used in a herbal blend to create calming feelings of peace.

Medicinal Benefits

The medicinal benefits of Blue Lotus stem largely from the sedative properties of the plant. It can use as a sleep aid, as a natural anti-anxiety remedy, and as a stress reliever. Blue Lotus contains nuciferan (a natural anti-spasmodic) along with aporphine, which will give you feelings of calming euphoria.

There are also reports of its use as a treatment for gastrointestinal problems. Diarrhea and dyspepsia, among other things, have reportedly been helped by ingesting Blue Lotus, although research is scarce in this particular area.

Effects

The effects of Blue Lotus seem to differ between different people, but it’s principal effects is what made this plant popular among the Egyptians. A calm sense of euphoria overtakes many users of the plant. It is often compared to MDMA, albeit less intense and more calming than stimulating. Depression can be alleviated in this way and, while not permanently, can give the user an opportunity to look at what causes their depression and really take something away from the experience.

In many people there is actually a mild, stimulant-like effect that is felt after taking Blue Lotus. The sedation is present, but the tingling, body energy sensation of stimulants fills them as well. This calm is a psychoactive property appreciated by it’s users. is found to be great for socializing and spending time with friends and family.

In addition, many people may help their erectile dysfunction after ingesting Blue lotus. Rather than turn to pharmaceutical drugs many people are turning to this plant as an aphrodisiac. This is especially true if the sexual dysfunction stems from depression.

Side Effects

The side effects of Blue Lotus are mild and are not harmful to most people. Hot flashes and mild jittery feeling can be present in large doses, but aren’t common.

The chief problem with Blue Lotus is found when combining it with other drugs. On its own it is an enjoyable plant, but when combined with illegal drugs like cannabis, or prescription painkillers, intense nausea and feelings of disorientation can be prevalent.

Legality

Blue Lotus is not a controlled substance in the United States, although not approved for human consumption. The cultivation, sale, and purchase of Nymphaea Caerulea is legal, but it cannot be sold for consumption. Incense and weaker teas are commonly found in stores, however, and must fall within certain regulations. Louisiana is the only state in the country which has passed new laws specifically dealing with Nympaea Caerulea, but it only serves to strengthen the ban on human consumption, not necessarily the distribution.

Russia is an exception to the international legality of Blue lotus. In the wake of scandals involving synthetic marijuana they have banned the substance completely.

Blue Lotus 4.00/5 (80.00%) 3 votes

8 thoughts on “Blue Lotus”

  1. Hi there alex I got a couple of questions maybe you can help me out.

    1) how long is the effect of blue lotus when taken in tincture form?
    2) Is pink lotus worth making a tincture out of , and is it as good as blue lotus?
    3) And do you know any way to make lotus brownies useing alcohol based tincture?
    Hopefully I hear from you soon I got many questions my friend peace and love

    1. 1. From experience it should be longer, although I never taken any in tincture form
      2. Pink lotus has about the same relaxing effects, blue lotus seems more popular as an herbal blend.
      3. Make the brownies and add less cooking oil/butter and more tinctures depending of your taste.

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